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Showing posts from February, 2006

Using PyCrypto with Spring Crypto/Spring Security Default Encoders

Spring Crypto Encryptor Details The Spring Crypto module is amazing. Secure defaults using standard interfaces really make it a pleasure to use, and with it being full tested and vetted, it also gives a develoepr the warm fuzzy feelings of nice Java security implentation. The standard interface is through the  org.springframework.security.crypto.encrypt.Encryptors class, defined (in version 3.2.0 here (the class API to which this blog post was written in July 2016). Spring Crypto uses AES256 encryption behind the scenes in its out of the box class setup; it's as easy as: In the above code snippet, the password  variable is a passcode, with the salt  variable used to create the AES key. It uses 256 bit encryption with the standard calls (depending on your JRE/Java Cryptography Extension (JCE) Setup, make sure to download the appropriate extension ). The default AESBytesEncryptor setup generates a 256 bit key (32 bytes) from a salted iteration done 1024 times. Another th

mobloggin'

Testing a moblog text post So, I finally got around to setting up my blogger.com mobile phone blog for phone image storage and auto-publication of blog entries from my phone keypad. ^_^ Setting up the Go Blogger service was not like anything I'd ever done before; the user starts the process by sending a text message! Then using a reply text message with an automatically created temp URL and pass-code, you link the pass code and mobile phone number to your blog by logging into the blogger.com website , which knows your phone number!. The auto-integration of mobile phone technology and blog services is crazy (like the glue!). After registration, of course, the images are auto-updated to the blog you associated with your phone number! Now I can take pictures anywhere and upload them to the intarweb! Next step: celebrity stalking! woo Now I need to update my css for this site to do some cool stuff to the mobile-post and mobile-photo classes, so that they are easily recogni

gmail chat

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So tonight, i used the gmail chat interface for the first time. my first impression is that, AJAX is going to change the way that people use thier desktops. first off, since I had emailed my enemy friend tommy recently, he showed up in my gmail 'Quick Contacts' menu with a little orange dot next to it. Not knowing what the orange dot meant, but it being different than the typical grey dots next to all the other @gmail accounts in my Quick Contact list, I decided to mash the mouse button onto it. 9:29 PM me : are you looking for love? And so on and so forth, until we talked for 20 minutes about the badness that is the <iframe> that the chat originally shows up in, to the fact that you can "pop" the iframe out into its own browser window (if you have your pop-up blocker disabled!), and continue to have a chat with the person to the fact that video games are the new golf. What was so nice about it (me being the minimalist that I am): the only thing in the