Using PyCrypto with Spring Crypto/Spring Security Default Encoders

Spring Crypto Encryptor Details The Spring Crypto module is amazing. Secure defaults using standard interfaces really make it a pleasure to use, and with it being full tested and vetted, it also gives a develoepr the warm fuzzy feelings of nice Java security implentation. The standard interface is through the  org.springframework.security.crypto.encrypt.Encryptors class, defined (in version 3.2.0 here (the class API to which this blog post was written in July 2016). Spring Crypto uses AES256 encryption behind the scenes in its out of the box class setup; it's as easy as: In the above code snippet, the password  variable is a passcode, with the salt  variable used to create the AES key. It uses 256 bit encryption with the standard calls (depending on your JRE/Java Cryptography Extension (JCE) Setup, make sure to download the appropriate extension ). The default AESBytesEncryptor setup generates a 256 bit key (32 bytes) from a salted iteration done 1024 times. Another th

updated blog license

i know that i'm not a major player in the content creation business (I just know those kids in Japan are stealing my blogs, translating them, and calling them their own!!) but I put the license at the bottom here, the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License. That's what the Creative Commons tells me when I select Yes to "Allow commercial uses of your work?" and "Allow modifications of your work?". So, all of you people re-mashing my sweet blog via your Pipes or Mashups, then feel free. =)

I also reduced the number of posts on the front page (soon my xmlrpc blogpost will have scrolled off) and added the archival links at the bottom. Enjoy.

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