Using PyCrypto with Spring Crypto/Spring Security Default Encoders

Spring Crypto Encryptor Details The Spring Crypto module is amazing. Secure defaults using standard interfaces really make it a pleasure to use, and with it being full tested and vetted, it also gives a develoepr the warm fuzzy feelings of nice Java security implentation. The standard interface is through the  org.springframework.security.crypto.encrypt.Encryptors class, defined (in version 3.2.0 here (the class API to which this blog post was written in July 2016). Spring Crypto uses AES256 encryption behind the scenes in its out of the box class setup; it's as easy as: In the above code snippet, the password  variable is a passcode, with the salt  variable used to create the AES key. It uses 256 bit encryption with the standard calls (depending on your JRE/Java Cryptography Extension (JCE) Setup, make sure to download the appropriate extension ). The default AESBytesEncryptor setup generates a 256 bit key (32 bytes) from a salted iteration done 1024 times. Another th

Dolphins Make Me Happy

Lately, I'm not sure if its part of a seasonal migration or something, but there seems to be a lot more dolphins in the water. And they seem to be a lot more playful. Meaning, they swim under/close to us when we are surfing and jump and twist out of the water pretty frequently. I should get pictures. They also seem to show up when we are surfing right when a huge set is about to roll in, and the dolphins always seem to ride the set waves while I try to survive the overhead+ sets.

So anyways, read this today: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21689083/

Basically dolphins showing altruistic tendencies towards a surf and protecting him while in the ocean. So they know we're out there. I wonder if they hear me when I jump in the water and screech back to them. :)

</happy>

Comments

Anonymous said…
you should get a dolphin tatto on your chest. that would be cool.

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